Texas Forest Service logo
TEXAS FOREST SERVICE LENDS A HAND AT SUPER BOWL

Print |   ]

super bowlJan. 31, 2011 — ARLINGTON, Texas — As the Pittsburgh Steelers prepare to take on the Green Bay Packers this weekend, Texas Forest Service is mobilizing an incident management team to support the state’s effort to coordinate and track resources for Super Bowl XLV.

Texas Forest Service is known statewide for its expertise in emergency response and incident command. The agency’s services were requested at the Super Bowl by the Texas Department of Public Safety.

“DPS, in addition to conducting its day-to-day duties, also has the responsibility of emergency management support to local governments when situations go beyond local capabilities,” said David Abernathy, assistant chief with Texas Forest Service. “We are providing incident management personnel in to the command post in Garland, which is coordinating the state’s resources to the Super Bowl.”

Texas Forest Service will place resource orders, facilitate briefings, develop and distribute an incident action plan, track costs associated with state agencies and provide personnel to assist with deployments and other tasks as assigned, Abernathy said.

In addition to ensuring things run smoothly at Cowboy Stadium, Texas Forest Service also provided another asset to the North Texas cities that will see an influx of visitors this weekend. The agency participated in the Super Grow XLV campaign, which facilitated the planting of more than 6,000 trees in 12 cities around Arlington.

Posting $50,000 toward the effort, Texas Forest Service partnered with the NFL, the Texas Trees Foundation and other agencies to ensure the trees were planted throughout North Texas to lessen environmental impacts of hosting the Super Bowl and improve the environment and quality of life in the area.

Jack Groh, director of Super Grow, said his agency has been facilitating environmental projects for the Super Bowl host city for 17 years.

“This was the most extensive urban forestry project ever in the history of Super Grow,” he said of the North Texas project. “This had more of a reach and more of an impact than we’ve ever had before.”

Contacts:
Paul Hannemann, Incident Response Department Head
979-458-7344 office, phannemann@tfs.tamu.edu

John Giedraitis, Urban Forestry Manager
979-458-6657 office, jgiedraitis@tfs.tamu.edu



Writer:
April Saginor, Communications Specialist
979-458-6619 office, 979-255-0591 cell, asaginor@tfs.tamu.edu