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DATA & ANALYSIS
  • FOREST ECONOMICS AND RESOURCE ANALYSIS: WOOD TECHNOLOGY AND UTILIZATION FAQS


    WOOD TECHNOLOGY AND UTILIZATION FAQS:
     + I have some hardwood trees on my land. What can I do with them?

    Hardwood trees may be valuable. A TFS forester can identify tree grade and provide you with a list of consultants and vendors to work with.

     + I know that grade hardwood lumber is worth more than pallet and cross tie stock, but my wood is always degraded by stain. Why?

    This staining is caused by the slow-dying enzymes in sapwood. Getting stain-free lumber is a very involved process. First you need to process logs into lumber within 10 to 15 days of felling (weather dependent). Then you must quickly dry the wood to kill the enzymes as quickly as possible. East Texas weather can make this difficult to achieve. There are treatments available that kill the enzymes and allow for normal drying. Please refer to the Prevention of Sapwood Discoloration in Hardwood report for further information on these processes.

     + Strong winds blew some trees down. How long can they sit in my yard?

    Oak trees need to be sold as soon as possible. Most other hardwood species can sit for up to two months before they start to devalue.

     + I have a pallet and cross tie mill. I'm interested in producing higher-value grade lumber, but what do I do with my grade lumber once it's sawn?

    A facility that we are aware of that dries lumber is Angelina Hardwood in Lufkin.

     + I have a lot of Sweetgum trees on my land. What can I do with them? Are they only good for firewood or can I get more money for them?

    Sweetgum is often used for pallet stock. Its physical properties make it similar to poplar, which is used for painted moldings or painted furniture. Unfortunately, this species is very hard to dry. Dried sweetgum lumber twists and bows (warps), making it unusable for many applications.

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